Schengen states that share a common land border with a third state are allowed, in accordance with the European Union Regulation 1931/2006, to conclude or maintain bilateral agreements with neighbouring third countries for the purpose of implementing a border area system. [273] Such agreements define a border area of up to 50 km on both sides of the border and provide for the granting of permits for small border traffic for the inhabitants of the border area. Authorizations can be used to cross the EU`s external border within the border area, are not stamped when crossing the border and must include the name and photo of the holder, as well as a statement indicating that the holder is not allowed to travel outside the border area and that any abuse is punishable. Most non-EU citizens (including Africa, Russia, India and China) require a Schengen visa to enter one of the Schengen member states. Some countries such as the United States, Canada, Mexico, Brazil, Australia and Japan have signed a visa waiver agreement with the European Union. This means that their nationals do not need a visa to enter Europe if their visit does not exceed 90 days. The new definition does not apply to visa waiver agreements between the EU and Antigua and Barbuda, the Bahamas, Barbados, Brazil, St Kitts and Nevis, Mauritius and Seychelles, where the old definition continues to apply. Of the 27 EU Member States, 22 are participating in the Schengen area. Of the five EU Member States that are not part of the Schengen area, four – Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus and Romania – are legally required to join the territory in the future, while the other – Ireland – maintains an opt-out. The four member states of the European Free Trade Association (EFTA), Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland, are not members of the EU, but have signed under the Schengen Agreement. Three European micro-states that are not members of the European Union, but which are enclaves or half-enclaves within an EU member state – Monaco, San Marino and Vatican City – are de facto part of the Schengen area. However, the inhabitants and citizens of these countries do not yet need a Schengen visa if they originally come from countries that have not signed this exceptional agreement. From 2015[update], Andorra, Monaco and San Marino negotiated an association agreement with the EU.

Andorra`s ambassador to Spain, Jaume Gaytén, said he hoped the agreement would include provisions that would make states associated with the Schengen agreement. [114] In many border crossing points at external borders, there are special routes for citizens of the EU, the EEA, Switzerland (as well as their family members) and other routes for all travellers, regardless of nationality. [217] At some border crossing points at the external border, there is a third route for schedule II travellers (i.e.:

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j$k1928649j$kSchengen states that share a common land border with a third state are allowed, in accordance with the European Union Regulation 1931/2006, to conclude or maintain bilateral agreements with neighbouring third countries for the purpose of implementing a border area system. Such agreements define a border area of...